In 1965 the Anglo-Belarusian Society began publishing a yearbook - The Journal of Byelorussian Studies.

Since 2013, the Journal of Belarusian Studies is published in London by the Ostrogorski Centre in cooperation with the Anglo-Belarusian Society

The Journal is distributed annually to universities, libraries and private subscribers in the UK, the US, Belarus and other countries throughout the world. 

The Journal publishes articles on Belarusian literature, linguistics, foreign relations, civil society, history and art, as well as book reviews.

Yaraslau Kryvoi serves as the Journal's editor. The Journal's Advisory Board consistists of Aleksander Nadson (UK), Arnold McMillin (UK), Jim Dingley (UK), Andrej Kotljarchuk (Sweden), Curt Woolheiser (USA), David Marples (Canada), Iryna Dubianetskaya (Belarus), Martin Paulsen (Norway), Alastair Rabagliati (Belgium) and Andrew Wilson (UK). 

The Journal is the oldest English language double blind peer-reviewed periodical on Belarusian studies. It is the only academic periodical about Belarus indexed by EBSCO and Google Scholar. The Journal is currently accepting new submissions.  

Buy the hard copy of the 2014 issue of the Journal online.

Buy the hard copy of the 2013 issue of the Journal online.

If you would like to be notified about the new issue of the journal please email editor @ belarusjournal.com

ISSN 0075-4161 (print)    ISSN 2052-6512 (online)    ISBN 978-1-291-41994-8

Editors' picks

  • Punishment Without Crime: Belarusian Prison Poetry

    In Belarus during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries many people were punished with imprisonment for the ‘crime’ of resisting hostile political systems or defending minority national and religious allegiances: under the Tsars, when Belarus was referred to as The North West Region of the Russian Empire; between 1921 and 1939 when Western Belarus was under Polish rule; before and after the Second World War in Soviet Belarus; and, of course, during the authoritarian reign of Aliaksandr Lukašenka.

  • Jewish, Tatar and Karaite Communal Dialects and their Importance for Byelorussian Historical Linguistics

    The purpose of the present paper is twofold: (1) to explore the possibility of reconstruction the broad outlines of Belarusian communal dialects in earlierperiods, and (2) to try to evaluate the importance of communal dialects for the description and reconstruction of the general Belarusian language in earlier periods... Belarusian speakers have come into contact with a variety of colloquial Indo-European and Altaic languages - e.g.

  • A Guide to Byelorussian Mythology

    Until comparatively recent times one branch of Belarusian history, namely Church history, suffered from undeserved neglect, and little or no research had been done into the cults of the pre-Christian era. The few treatises on the history of Belarus which have been published in the past and which deal with the pre-Christian beliefs of the Belarusian tribes, give nothing more than a very general and vague outline.