In 1965 the Anglo-Belarusian Society began publishing a yearbook - The Journal of Byelorussian Studies.

Since 2013, the Journal of Belarusian Studies is published in London by the Ostrogorski Centre in cooperation with the Anglo-Belarusian Society

The Journal is distributed annually to universities, libraries and private subscribers in the UK, the US, Belarus and other countries throughout the world. 

The Journal publishes articles on Belarusian literature, linguistics, foreign relations, civil society, history and art, as well as book reviews.

The Journal is the oldest English language double blind peer-reviewed periodical on Belarusian studies. It is the only academic periodical about Belarus indexed by EBSCO and Google Scholar. The Journal is currently accepting new submissions.  

Buy the hard copy of the 2017 issue of the Journal online.

Buy the hard copy of the 2016 issue of the Journal online.

Buy the hard copy of the 2015 issue of the Journal online.

Buy the hard copy of the 2014 issue of the Journal online.

Buy the hard copy of the 2013 issue of the Journal online.

If you would like to be notified about the new issue of the journal please email editor @ belarusjournal.com

ISSN 0075-4161 (print)    ISSN 2052-6512 (online)    ISBN 978-1-291-41994-8

Editors' picks

  • Substitution of Civil Society in Belarus: Government-Organised Non-Governmental Organisations

    Belarus, as a young state that received its full independence only in 1991, had no historical record of sovereignty except for a few months in 1918. This short period of time did little to create the foundations for a historical discourse for most Belarusians. When compared to Ukraine, the Baltic States or Poland, due to historic ties, Belarus’ path is different in many respects.

  • Jewish, Tatar and Karaite Communal Dialects and their Importance for Byelorussian Historical Linguistics

    The purpose of the present paper is twofold: (1) to explore the possibility of reconstruction the broad outlines of Belarusian communal dialects in earlierperiods, and (2) to try to evaluate the importance of communal dialects for the description and reconstruction of the general Belarusian language in earlier periods... Belarusian speakers have come into contact with a variety of colloquial Indo-European and Altaic languages - e.g.

  • The Struggle for Byelorussia's Autonomy in the First State Duma (1906)

    Elections to the first Duma  of the Russian Empire in February-March 1906 were held in an atmosphere of mixed hopes, confusion and nationalistic tension...The Belarusian Socialist Hramada, the only possible organiser of the Belarusian national element boycotted the election together with other leftist socialist parties...Officially, there were twelve Belarusians in the first Duma. But Polish deputies from Litwa and Rus did not join the Polish Circle, but, together with the Belarusians and Lithuanians, joined the autonomists' faction...