In 1965 the Anglo-Belarusian Society began publishing a yearbook - The Journal of Byelorussian Studies.

Since 2013, the Journal of Belarusian Studies is published in London by the Ostrogorski Centre in cooperation with the Anglo-Belarusian Society

The Journal is distributed annually to universities, libraries and private subscribers in the UK, the US, Belarus and other countries throughout the world. 

The Journal publishes articles on Belarusian literature, linguistics, foreign relations, civil society, history and art, as well as book reviews.

Yaraslau Kryvoi serves as the Journal's editor. The Journal's Advisory Board consistists of Aleksander Nadson (UK), Arnold McMillin (UK), Jim Dingley (UK), Andrej Kotljarchuk (Sweden), Curt Woolheiser (USA), David Marples (Canada), Iryna Dubianetskaya (Belarus), Martin Paulsen (Norway), Alastair Rabagliati (Belgium) and Andrew Wilson (UK). 

The Journal is the oldest English language peer-reviewed periodical on Belarusian studies. It is currently accepting new submissions

The 2014 issue of the Journal (hard copy) can be purchased online.

ISSN 0075-4161 (print)    ISSN 2052-6512 (online)    ISBN 978-1-291-41994-8

Editors' picks

  • Babrujsk and its Neighbourhood in the Early Seventeenth Century

    In Eastern Europe, the period from the mid-fifteenth to the mid-seventeenth centuries was one of great importance in agrarian history. Certainly during the whole period...the most far-reaching single event of economic history was the voloka agrarian reform of 1557. In the sixteenth century cadastres were completed to record the redistributed holdings of land and the taxes due from them.

  • Noblewomen’s Dowries in the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in the Sixteenth – Seventeenth Centuries

    The article looks at the laws and traditions related to noblewomen’s dowries in the Grand Duchy of Lithuania of the sixteenth – seventeenth centuries. Dr Sliž touches upon such aspects as the order of apportionment of a dowry, content of a dowry, receipt of a dowry, and disposal of a dowry. It describes a number of interesting cases related to noblewomen’s dowries, which paint a vivid picture of life in the territory of now known as Belarus.

  • World War II Memory Politics: Jewish, Polish and Roma Minorities of Belarus

    The article examines contemporary memory politics in Belarus as exhibited by new monuments to Holocaust victims, the genocide of the Roma people, and the mass killings of representatives of the Polish minority during World War II. It analyses various instances of the exploitation of the mythology of World War II for daily political purposes.