In 1965 the Anglo-Belarusian Society began publishing a yearbook - The Journal of Byelorussian Studies.

Since 2013, the Journal of Belarusian Studies is published in London by the Ostrogorski Centre in cooperation with the Anglo-Belarusian Society

The Journal is distributed annually to universities, libraries and private subscribers in the UK, the US, Belarus and other countries throughout the world. 

The Journal publishes articles on Belarusian literature, linguistics, foreign relations, civil society, history and art, as well as book reviews.

The Journal is the oldest English language double-blind peer-reviewed periodical on Belarusian studies. It is the only academic periodical about Belarus indexed by EBSCO, ERIH PLUS, Google Scholar and other databases. The Journal is currently accepting new submissions.  

Buy the hard copy of the 2017 issue of the Journal online.

Buy the hard copy of the 2016 issue of the Journal online.

Buy the hard copy of the 2015 issue of the Journal online.

Buy the hard copy of the 2014 issue of the Journal online.

Buy the hard copy of the 2013 issue of the Journal online.

If you would like to be notified about the new issue of the journal please email editor @ belarusjournal.com

See the Journal's of Belarusian Studies Publication Ethics and Malpractice Statement

ISSN 0075-4161 (print)    ISSN 2052-6512 (online)    ISBN 978-1-291-41994-8

Editors' picks

  • Jan Čačot in Byelorussian and Polish Literature

    Poet, ethnographer, translator and critic, Chachot played an important role in the cultural life of his time. As a member of the philomath literary circle and a close friend of Adam Mickievicz he was acclaimed as the principal lyrist...

  • The Writings of St. Cyril of Turau

    Cyril, Bishop of Turaū, was one of the most interesting figures of his time, and the lack of detail concerning his life makes his personality all the more intriguing. On the one hand we have a glimpse of a humble monk, practising the most severe forms of ascetism; on the other, we find a man of great learning, far superior to that of the vast majority of his contemporaries, not only in Belarus, but among the East Slavs in general. The great number of manuscripts in which the works of St.

  • Jewish, Tatar and Karaite Communal Dialects and their Importance for Byelorussian Historical Linguistics

    The purpose of the present paper is twofold: (1) to explore the possibility of reconstruction the broad outlines of Belarusian communal dialects in earlierperiods, and (2) to try to evaluate the importance of communal dialects for the description and reconstruction of the general Belarusian language in earlier periods... Belarusian speakers have come into contact with a variety of colloquial Indo-European and Altaic languages - e.g.