In 1965 the Anglo-Belarusian Society began publishing a yearbook - The Journal of Byelorussian Studies.

Since 2013, the Journal of Belarusian Studies is published in London by the Ostrogorski Centre in cooperation with the Anglo-Belarusian Society

The Journal is distributed annually to universities, libraries and private subscribers in the UK, the US, Belarus and other countries throughout the world. 

The Journal publishes articles on Belarusian literature, linguistics, foreign relations, civil society, history and art, as well as book reviews.

The Journal is the oldest English language double blind peer-reviewed periodical on Belarusian studies. It is the only academic periodical about Belarus indexed by EBSCO and Google Scholar. The Journal is currently accepting new submissions.  

Buy the hard copy of the 2015 issue of the Journal online.

Buy the hard copy of the 2014 issue of the Journal online.

Buy the hard copy of the 2013 issue of the Journal online.

If you would like to be notified about the new issue of the journal please email editor @ belarusjournal.com

ISSN 0075-4161 (print)    ISSN 2052-6512 (online)    ISBN 978-1-291-41994-8

Editors' picks

  • XIXth Century Attitudes to Byelorussian before Karski

    The 19th c. produced a good deal of scholarly interest in Belarus, a territory that had throughout the 18th c. suffered the most abject material and cultural conditions....

    Russian and Polish ethnographers found Belarus a rich source of hitherto unrecorded material, whilst linguists were confronted with the problem not merely of describing the language but also of placing it within the general Slavonic framework...

  • Between the EU and Russia: Geopolitical Games in Belarus

    The three-way relationship between Belarus, Russia, and the European Union has often been discussed, particularly concerning what seems to be a tug-of-war for the allegiance of Belarus between two power bases: the one a traditional ally and regional power; the other an important economic partner with political ambitions. But it has less often been portrayed for its prevailing characteristic: a convenient instrument deployed by the Lukashenka regime in Belarus to keep itself afloat. Official Belarus has achieved this feat in a number of ways that will be explored in this paper.

  • Jewish, Tatar and Karaite Communal Dialects and their Importance for Byelorussian Historical Linguistics

    The purpose of the present paper is twofold: (1) to explore the possibility of reconstruction the broad outlines of Belarusian communal dialects in earlierperiods, and (2) to try to evaluate the importance of communal dialects for the description and reconstruction of the general Belarusian language in earlier periods... Belarusian speakers have come into contact with a variety of colloquial Indo-European and Altaic languages - e.g.