In 1965 the Anglo-Belarusian Society began publishing a yearbook - The Journal of Byelorussian Studies.

Since 2013, the Journal of Belarusian Studies is published in London by the Ostrogorski Centre in cooperation with the Anglo-Belarusian Society

The Journal is distributed annually to universities, libraries and private subscribers in the UK, the US, Belarus and other countries throughout the world. 

The Journal publishes articles on Belarusian literature, linguistics, foreign relations, civil society, history and art, as well as book reviews.

Yaraslau Kryvoi serves as the Journal's editor. The Journal's Advisory Board consistists of Aleksander Nadson (UK), Arnold McMillin (UK), Jim Dingley (UK), Andrej Kotljarchuk (Sweden), Curt Woolheiser (USA), David Marples (Canada), Iryna Dubianetskaya (Belarus), Martin Paulsen (Norway), Alastair Rabagliati (Belgium) and Andrew Wilson (UK). 

The Journal is the oldest English language peer-reviewed periodical on Belarusian studies. It is currently accepting new submissions

The 2014 issue of the Journal (hard copy) can be purchased online.

ISSN 0075-4161 (print)    ISSN 2052-6512 (online)    ISBN 978-1-291-41994-8

Editors' picks

  • Naša Niva

    On the 23rd of November 1906 the first number of the Belarusian weekly journal Naša Niva (Our Cornfield) was published in Vilna. If one excepts its short-lived predecessor Naša Dola (Our Fate) which ran to only six issues, it was the first lawful Belarusian paper to be published in the Russian empire. During the subsequent nine years of its existence it became a focal point of the Belarusian national renaissance movement.

  • Jewish, Tatar and Karaite Communal Dialects and their Importance for Byelorussian Historical Linguistics

    The purpose of the present paper is twofold: (1) to explore the possibility of reconstruction the broad outlines of Belarusian communal dialects in earlierperiods, and (2) to try to evaluate the importance of communal dialects for the description and reconstruction of the general Belarusian language in earlier periods... Belarusian speakers have come into contact with a variety of colloquial Indo-European and Altaic languages - e.g.

  • XIXth Century Attitudes to Byelorussian before Karski

    The 19th c. produced a good deal of scholarly interest in Belarus, a territory that had throughout the 18th c. suffered the most abject material and cultural conditions....

    Russian and Polish ethnographers found Belarus a rich source of hitherto unrecorded material, whilst linguists were confronted with the problem not merely of describing the language but also of placing it within the general Slavonic framework...