In 1965 the Anglo-Belarusian Society began publishing a yearbook - The Journal of Byelorussian Studies.

Since 2013, the Journal of Belarusian Studies is published in London by the Ostrogorski Centre in cooperation with the Anglo-Belarusian Society

The Journal is distributed annually to universities, libraries and private subscribers in the UK, the US, Belarus and other countries throughout the world. 

The Journal publishes articles on Belarusian literature, linguistics, foreign relations, civil society, history and art, as well as book reviews.

The Journal is the oldest English language double-blind peer-reviewed periodical on Belarusian studies. It is the only academic periodical about Belarus indexed by EBSCO, ERIH PLUS, Google Scholar and other databases. The Journal is currently accepting new submissions.  

Buy the hard copy of the 2017 issue of the Journal online.

Buy the hard copy of the 2016 issue of the Journal online.

Buy the hard copy of the 2015 issue of the Journal online.

Buy the hard copy of the 2014 issue of the Journal online.

Buy the hard copy of the 2013 issue of the Journal online.

If you would like to be notified about the new issue of the journal please email editor @ belarusjournal.com

See the Journal's of Belarusian Studies Publication Ethics and Malpractice Statement

ISSN 0075-4161 (print)    ISSN 2052-6512 (online)    ISBN 978-1-291-41994-8

Editors' picks

  • XIXth Century Attitudes to Byelorussian before Karski

    The 19th c. produced a good deal of scholarly interest in Belarus, a territory that had throughout the 18th c. suffered the most abject material and cultural conditions....

    Russian and Polish ethnographers found Belarus a rich source of hitherto unrecorded material, whilst linguists were confronted with the problem not merely of describing the language but also of placing it within the general Slavonic framework...

  • Punishment Without Crime: Belarusian Prison Poetry

    In Belarus during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries many people were punished with imprisonment for the ‘crime’ of resisting hostile political systems or defending minority national and religious allegiances: under the Tsars, when Belarus was referred to as The North West Region of the Russian Empire; between 1921 and 1939 when Western Belarus was under Polish rule; before and after the Second World War in Soviet Belarus; and, of course, during the authoritarian reign of Aliaksandr Lukašenka.

  • World War II Memory Politics: Jewish, Polish and Roma Minorities of Belarus

    The article examines contemporary memory politics in Belarus as exhibited by new monuments to Holocaust victims, the genocide of the Roma people, and the mass killings of representatives of the Polish minority during World War II. It analyses various instances of the exploitation of the mythology of World War II for daily political purposes.