In 1965 the Anglo-Belarusian Society began publishing a yearbook - The Journal of Byelorussian Studies.

Since 2013, the Journal of Belarusian Studies is published in London by the Ostrogorski Centre in cooperation with the Anglo-Belarusian Society

The Journal is distributed annually to universities, libraries and private subscribers in the UK, the US, Belarus and other countries throughout the world. 

The Journal publishes articles on Belarusian literature, linguistics, foreign relations, civil society, history and art, as well as book reviews.

Yaraslau Kryvoi serves as the Journal's editor. The Journal's Advisory Board consistists of Aleksander Nadson (UK), Arnold McMillin (UK), Jim Dingley (UK), Andrej Kotljarchuk (Sweden), Curt Woolheiser (USA), David Marples (Canada), Iryna Dubianetskaya (Belarus), Martin Paulsen (Norway), Alastair Rabagliati (Belgium) and Andrew Wilson (UK). 

The Journal is the oldest English language peer-reviewed periodical on Belarusian studies. It is currently accepting new submissions

The 2014 issue of the Journal (hard copy) can be purchased online.

ISSN 0075-4161 (print)    ISSN 2052-6512 (online)    ISBN 978-1-291-41994-8

Editors' picks

  • World War II Memory Politics: Jewish, Polish and Roma Minorities of Belarus

    The article examines contemporary memory politics in Belarus as exhibited by new monuments to Holocaust victims, the genocide of the Roma people, and the mass killings of representatives of the Polish minority during World War II. It analyses various instances of the exploitation of the mythology of World War II for daily political purposes.

  • A Guide to Byelorussian Mythology

    Until comparatively recent times one branch of Belarusian history, namely Church history, suffered from undeserved neglect, and little or no research had been done into the cults of the pre-Christian era. The few treatises on the history of Belarus which have been published in the past and which deal with the pre-Christian beliefs of the Belarusian tribes, give nothing more than a very general and vague outline.

  • Between the EU and Russia: Geopolitical Games in Belarus

    The three-way relationship between Belarus, Russia, and the European Union has often been discussed, particularly concerning what seems to be a tug-of-war for the allegiance of Belarus between two power bases: the one a traditional ally and regional power; the other an important economic partner with political ambitions. But it has less often been portrayed for its prevailing characteristic: a convenient instrument deployed by the Lukashenka regime in Belarus to keep itself afloat. Official Belarus has achieved this feat in a number of ways that will be explored in this paper.