In 1965 the Anglo-Belarusian Society began publishing a yearbook - The Journal of Byelorussian Studies.

Since 2013, the Journal of Belarusian Studies is published in London by the Ostrogorski Centre in cooperation with the Anglo-Belarusian Society

The Journal is distributed annually to universities, libraries and private subscribers in the UK, the US, Belarus and other countries throughout the world. 

The Journal publishes articles on Belarusian literature, linguistics, foreign relations, civil society, history and art, as well as book reviews.

The Journal is the oldest English language double blind peer-reviewed periodical on Belarusian studies. It is the only academic periodical about Belarus indexed by EBSCO and Google Scholar. The Journal is currently accepting new submissions.  

Buy the hard copy of the 2015 issue of the Journal online.

Buy the hard copy of the 2014 issue of the Journal online.

Buy the hard copy of the 2013 issue of the Journal online.

If you would like to be notified about the new issue of the journal please email editor @ belarusjournal.com

ISSN 0075-4161 (print)    ISSN 2052-6512 (online)    ISBN 978-1-291-41994-8

Editors' picks

  • The Writings of St. Cyril of Turau

    Cyril, Bishop of Turaū, was one of the most interesting figures of his time, and the lack of detail concerning his life makes his personality all the more intriguing. On the one hand we have a glimpse of a humble monk, practising the most severe forms of ascetism; on the other, we find a man of great learning, far superior to that of the vast majority of his contemporaries, not only in Belarus, but among the East Slavs in general. The great number of manuscripts in which the works of St.

  • Between the EU and Russia: Geopolitical Games in Belarus

    The three-way relationship between Belarus, Russia, and the European Union has often been discussed, particularly concerning what seems to be a tug-of-war for the allegiance of Belarus between two power bases: the one a traditional ally and regional power; the other an important economic partner with political ambitions. But it has less often been portrayed for its prevailing characteristic: a convenient instrument deployed by the Lukashenka regime in Belarus to keep itself afloat. Official Belarus has achieved this feat in a number of ways that will be explored in this paper.

  • Naša Niva

    On the 23rd of November 1906 the first number of the Belarusian weekly journal Naša Niva (Our Cornfield) was published in Vilna. If one excepts its short-lived predecessor Naša Dola (Our Fate) which ran to only six issues, it was the first lawful Belarusian paper to be published in the Russian empire. During the subsequent nine years of its existence it became a focal point of the Belarusian national renaissance movement.