In 1965 the Anglo-Belarusian Society began publishing a yearbook - The Journal of Byelorussian Studies.

Since 2013, the Journal of Belarusian Studies is published in London by the Ostrogorski Centre in cooperation with the Anglo-Belarusian Society

The Journal is distributed annually to universities, libraries and private subscribers in the UK, the US, Belarus and other countries throughout the world. 

The Journal publishes articles on Belarusian literature, linguistics, foreign relations, civil society, history and art, as well as book reviews.

The Journal is the oldest English language double blind peer-reviewed periodical on Belarusian studies. It is the only academic periodical about Belarus indexed by EBSCO and Google Scholar. The Journal is currently accepting new submissions.  

Buy the hard copy of the 2016 issue of the Journal online.

Buy the hard copy of the 2015 issue of the Journal online.

Buy the hard copy of the 2014 issue of the Journal online.

Buy the hard copy of the 2013 issue of the Journal online.

If you would like to be notified about the new issue of the journal please email editor @ belarusjournal.com

ISSN 0075-4161 (print)    ISSN 2052-6512 (online)    ISBN 978-1-291-41994-8

Editors' picks

  • Political Cartoon at the Service of West Belarus Left Wing Movement: the Journal “Malanka”

  • The Life of Saint Euphrosyne of Połack

    Saint Euphrosyne (c. 1105-1167) was the granddaughter of the famous prince of Polack, Usiaslau (Vseslav) whose long reign (1044-1101) and many exploits ... made such an impression on his contemporaries that they refused to believe him to be an ordinary mortal... Young Pradslava - such was the name of Euphrosyne before she took the veil - seems to have inherited many traits of her grandfather's character...This became manifest early in her life when she refused all proposals of marriage and, without her parent's knowledge, run away to the convent...

  • The Struggle for Byelorussia's Autonomy in the First State Duma (1906)

    Elections to the first Duma  of the Russian Empire in February-March 1906 were held in an atmosphere of mixed hopes, confusion and nationalistic tension...The Belarusian Socialist Hramada, the only possible organiser of the Belarusian national element boycotted the election together with other leftist socialist parties...Officially, there were twelve Belarusians in the first Duma. But Polish deputies from Litwa and Rus did not join the Polish Circle, but, together with the Belarusians and Lithuanians, joined the autonomists' faction...