In 1965 the Anglo-Belarusian Society began publishing a yearbook - The Journal of Byelorussian Studies.

Since 2013, the Journal of Belarusian Studies is published in London by the Ostrogorski Centre in cooperation with the Anglo-Belarusian Society

The Journal is distributed annually to universities, libraries and private subscribers in the UK, the US, Belarus and other countries throughout the world. 

The Journal publishes articles on Belarusian literature, linguistics, foreign relations, civil society, history and art, as well as book reviews.

Yaraslau Kryvoi serves as the Journal's editor. The Journal's Advisory Board consistists of Aleksander Nadson (UK), Arnold McMillin (UK), Jim Dingley (UK), Andrej Kotljarchuk (Sweden), Curt Woolheiser (USA), David Marples (Canada), Iryna Dubianetskaya (Belarus), Martin Paulsen (Norway), Alastair Rabagliati (Belgium) and Andrew Wilson (UK). 

The Journal is the oldest English language double blind peer-reviewed periodical on Belarusian studies. It is the only academic periodical about Belarus indexed by EBSCO and Google Scholar. The Journal is currently accepting new submissions.  

Buy the hard copy of the 2014 issue of the Journal online.

Buy the hard copy of the 2013 issue of the Journal online.

If you would like to be notified about the new issue of the journal please email editor @ belarusjournal.com

ISSN 0075-4161 (print)    ISSN 2052-6512 (online)    ISBN 978-1-291-41994-8

Editors' picks

  • Punishment Without Crime: Belarusian Prison Poetry

    In Belarus during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries many people were punished with imprisonment for the ‘crime’ of resisting hostile political systems or defending minority national and religious allegiances: under the Tsars, when Belarus was referred to as The North West Region of the Russian Empire; between 1921 and 1939 when Western Belarus was under Polish rule; before and after the Second World War in Soviet Belarus; and, of course, during the authoritarian reign of Aliaksandr Lukašenka.

  • The Struggle for Byelorussia's Autonomy in the First State Duma (1906)

    Elections to the first Duma  of the Russian Empire in February-March 1906 were held in an atmosphere of mixed hopes, confusion and nationalistic tension...The Belarusian Socialist Hramada, the only possible organiser of the Belarusian national element boycotted the election together with other leftist socialist parties...Officially, there were twelve Belarusians in the first Duma. But Polish deputies from Litwa and Rus did not join the Polish Circle, but, together with the Belarusians and Lithuanians, joined the autonomists' faction...

  • Belarusian Foreign Policy in the Middle East: a Neorealist Model of Relations between Belarus and Iran

    Relations between Belarus and Iran have stirred up controversies concerning their alleged anti-American character. Yet, the Belarusian leadership has avoided making serious anti-American gestures with Tehran doing its best to alleviate Western concerns in this regard. The chosen course of relations has demonstrated the limits of defiance to the international system. Both Minsk and Tehran cannot ignore the counteractions of their opponents, especially the United States, to this cooperation.