In 1965 the Anglo-Belarusian Society began publishing a yearbook - The Journal of Byelorussian Studies.

Since 2013, the Journal of Belarusian Studies is published in London by the Ostrogorski Centre in cooperation with the Anglo-Belarusian Society

The Journal is distributed annually to universities, libraries and private subscribers in the UK, the US, Belarus and other countries throughout the world. 

The Journal publishes articles on Belarusian literature, linguistics, foreign relations, civil society, history and art, as well as book reviews.

The Journal is the oldest English language double blind peer-reviewed periodical on Belarusian studies. It is the only academic periodical about Belarus indexed by EBSCO and Google Scholar. The Journal is currently accepting new submissions.  

Buy the hard copy of the 2017 issue of the Journal online.

Buy the hard copy of the 2016 issue of the Journal online.

Buy the hard copy of the 2015 issue of the Journal online.

Buy the hard copy of the 2014 issue of the Journal online.

Buy the hard copy of the 2013 issue of the Journal online.

If you would like to be notified about the new issue of the journal please email editor @ belarusjournal.com

ISSN 0075-4161 (print)    ISSN 2052-6512 (online)    ISBN 978-1-291-41994-8

Editors' picks

  • From the Grand Duchy of Lithuania to the Belarusian Democratic Republic: the Idea of Belarusian Statehood, 1915-1919

    During the first decades of the 20th century Belarusian national identity was in its infancy. Nationalist agitation was confined to a small elite. The political situation reflected a condition of widespread poverty and economic underdevelopment. The Russian imperial government left a legacy of a low level of education, few schools, and widespread illiteracy. Early national activists, such as the circle around the journal Naša Niva (1906-1915) argued for the use of the Belarusian language in all aspects of life.
     
  • Noblewomen’s Dowries in the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in the Sixteenth – Seventeenth Centuries

    The article looks at the laws and traditions related to noblewomen’s dowries in the Grand Duchy of Lithuania of the sixteenth – seventeenth centuries. Dr Sliž touches upon such aspects as the order of apportionment of a dowry, content of a dowry, receipt of a dowry, and disposal of a dowry. It describes a number of interesting cases related to noblewomen’s dowries, which paint a vivid picture of life in the territory of now known as Belarus.

  • Jan Čačot in Byelorussian and Polish Literature

    Poet, ethnographer, translator and critic, Chachot played an important role in the cultural life of his time. As a member of the philomath literary circle and a close friend of Adam Mickievicz he was acclaimed as the principal lyrist...